Category Archives: President Barack Hussein Obama

Volume Three Finale: Lordship Salvation

In 2008, Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan referred to then-Senator Barack Hussein Obama as the Messiah. Four years later, the son of America’s most famous preacher, Billy Graham, insisted Willard “Mitt” Romney be elected to bring America back to God. Such statements were actually typical for Presidential elections. The difference this time around was that people actually believed them literally. They still do.

When Obama openly touted same-sex marriage on May 9, 2012, the Black church was issued a challenge. In order to re-elect the so-called first Black President, they would have to all but equally endorse homosexuality. If conservatives wished to be rid of Obama, they would have to accept a Mormon elder as their leader. On November 6, 2012, the church overall was forced to compromise. But the Messiah won again, so…

The single biggest draw to the three Abraham-based faiths is now the centerpiece of identity politics. No longer do they look to a book to find redemption from an invisible deity. Instead, they seek restitution in a man on television. Regardless of what party, ideology, or even faith they belong to, their hope lies in Washington, D.C. The greater portion of the U.S. believes in Lordship Salvation: Calling (or voting) on the name of a benefactor to make everything better.

Now, by “salvation”, I don’t mean protection from a scary afterlife, or the promise of a nice one. That’s the old definition. The here and now are the issue today, and the reward for faith is being able to continue in whatever lifestyle one wants to have. Apparently, said lifestyle can only be maintained with the proper final political authority in place. And that final authority will not only validate one’s lifestyle; they’ll destroy those who refuse to do so.

Where the Bible fails, the ballot prevails. When the ballot fails, and one doesn’t get what they want, they go back to the Bible, or some other ideology, for comfort. In either case, the people never find peace. As long as there’s one person out there who mocks their idol or mindset, they simply can’t rest. Things HAVE to line up just right. And they have to line up according to their Savior… which just so happens to side with their worldview.

Obama and Ronald Wilson Reagan, among other political figures, are indeed fascinating and charismatic. But much like Jesus Christ and Mohammed, their followers don’t know them personally from face-to-face encounters and interactions. Their greatest asset is that they embody the mindsets of their worshipers, who can make them into anything they want them to be. They need only be somebody in whose name they can do what they want.

That’s the whole thing behind the worship of such people and celebrities like Brangelina. They embody a certain holy  ideology, and therefore are saints. You can put Jesus Christ in a jar of piss and call it art. Refer to a Long-Legged Mack Daddy or laugh at a Senator reading Dr. Seuss on the Senate floor, and you’re blaspheming. And you’ll notice so-called atheists are the best about calling out such heresies.

Anytime a nation has left a church, it’s ultimately not become atheist. Instead, the worship is transferred to the state, and those who are executively employed in it, such as the former Soviet Union. Since most religions teach of an all-provident entity in heaven, said benefactor need only take up an earthly address to be worshipped. This is called statism today, but it’s ultimately socialism. Conservatives and progressives are only fighting over who’ll run things.

I became a Deist in 2011 to avoid the emotional and manipulative roller coaster of church. I could do like so many and just go along but I won’t. Following this blog, there will be NO further direct postings about politics, especially identity politics. I didn’t stop one form of worship just to be imprisoned in another.

Next time: Volume Four, Chapter One. This blog will now be going in a different direction…

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Volume Three, Chapter Eleven: Yes, America DOES Have a State Religion

On Tuesday,September 11, 2001, I was working, and people kept telling me about a bunch of plane crashes in like an hour. Well, when I went home for lunch, images of the two planes hitting the Twin Towers were all over the place. That night, Whitney Houston’s epic rendition of the “Star-Spangled Banner” from Super Bowl XXV was all over the place.

On Sunday, September 16, 2001, EVERY church parking lot was full. To look at the evening news, every temple, synagogue, and mosque was, too. America had been attacked by Islamic jihadists, and folks just didn’t know what to do. And the question loomed: how could God allow this to happen to this nation? The 9/11 attacks dramatically changed the religious landscape of America, possibly even the world.

9/11 brought Islam to the forefront, and challenged Christianity. The subsequent War on Terror/Islam, prompted incredible debate all over the country. After a while, all three Abrahamic faiths (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam) were being scrutinized. But by 2007, Christianity and Islam were merely talking points. The next year, a professing United Church of Christ member with a Muslim upbringing became the President of the United States.

The election of Barack Hussein “The Long-Legged Mack Daddy” Obama established identity politics as the official U.S. religion.

And if you’re one of those who still has a strong reaction to his Presidential nickname, thank you for proving my point.

As I said back in 2012, religion allows you to do, say, and believe things you wouldn’t otherwise. Since that time, we’ve seen heroes and heathens come and go with breakneck speed. The bar to decide who’s who is incredibly low. A person can switch sides based on a few words. Identity politics have a lot in common with the other three formerly major religions in America.

Ideological Purity:  Jews, Christians, and Muslims are demanded to believe and do certain things. So are ethnic and sexual minorities. And to hear it from the plurality of tribes to choose from, you’d think they were all different. But the vegan could pass for a Seventh-Day Adventist. Not all Democrats celebrate abortion. And some of the most loyal conservatives are not old White males. Such abnormalities are considered heretics, but they can always redeem themselves… in a way.

Evangelism/Soul Winning: The whole point of a debate, especially online, is not just to say one won. It’s also to get others on their side. The thinking is that the more “converts” one has, the more prestige they’ll get when things fall in place… assuming they ever even do. Or, as they say in church, they’ll have more stars in their crown. The whole point is to hopefully endear one’s self to those in charge of their selected great and noble cause. That goes right along with…

Works Orientation:  As long as you publicly do certain things, you can pretty much live how you want. We’ve all seen the zealous Southern Baptist making sure everybody sees him praying. Then we find out he abuses some family member. The exhibitionist ice-bucket challenger or the guy who quotes some ideologue to promote their ministry cause is right next door to him ideologically. All of them ultimately do it to exhalt themselves and to secure…

“Everlasting Life”: Nobody likes to consider the fact that we’re all going to die one day. So we do what we can to avoid eternal torment and aim for eternal bliss. When you don’t believe in heaven or hell, just aim for “the right side of history” or “what’s best for the family”. The communion in hope of remembrance, the desperate need to be remembered as a pure and noble person, is binding. And blinding, as I’ll show next time in the conclusion of Volume Three.

Volume Three, Chapter Three: “At least he ain’t Shawn…”

I was talking to somebody I hadn’t seen in a few years. I used to work with “Trish” some years back, and we were fairly close. So we went to lunch one day. The usual small talk commenced; then we got the talking about our personal lives.

Now, the last time I had seen Trish, she was dating and living with a guy named “Shawn”. Well, for the last four or five years, she had been dating “Bret”. They were engaged, and she was expecting. I congratulated her, of course, and told her to invite me as soon as they set a date.

“I’m not in a hurry, really”, Trish said. “After all the sh*t with Shawn, I want to take my time. Besides, Bret says he wants to get married. Shawn never even mentioned it!”

“Well, this Bret fellow seems like a good guy”, I said.

“Bret’s a good guy, at least better than Shawn. I knew that when I met him at Lita’s wedding. Shawn’s sorry *ss was there, too, and I started to leave until I saw Bret trying to talk to me. I almost let him keep me from a good guy.

“Who?”

“Shawn! Duh! I mean yeah, Bret might get out and about every now and then, but you know how men are. I can keep him in line, though. He knows I’ll throw his *ss out in a minute, just like I stepped out on Shawn after I caught him!”

“Well, you do what you’ve gotta. As long as you’re cool with it, it’s your world.”

“Oh, I’m fine with it, Douglas. We’ve got five years in this together. At least he ain’t Shawn.”

“Bret might get out and about every now and then, but you know how men are.” “We’ve got five years in this together. At least he ain’t Shawn.” 

And there you have it: a scenario that plays out somewhere in America hourly. Somebody right now is in love with a guy they can only defend by exhuming and blasting a relationship and ex from five years prior. Either that, or they have to use the lowest common social denominator to validate the new guy (“You know how men are”). He actually doesn’t have to be an improvement; somebody will convince themselves he is, regardless. The only requirement said somebody makes for said new guy is that he not have the same name as their ex from five years prior.

Sound familiar?

Volume Three, Chapter Two: How the Illuminati Got Whitney… and Other Things Tupac Told Me

Contrary to popular belief, I don’t think the current paranoia in America began in 2008. At the very least, it started with the volatile 2000 Presidential Election. The last two elections, in comparison, are obviously smaller in impact than the aforementioned events. In fact, it’s safe to say that all the prior dramas left the door wide open for the current sh*t. And the origins of our current plight in America are varied but always… interesting. The main goal of these conspiracy theories is to point blame for all of mankind’s ills at some supernaturally powerful secret society. The last two U.S. Presidents are certainly lightning rods for conspiracy theories. But nowadays, anything unfavorable to somebody could be considered the work of some shadowy empire.

George Walker Bush is only the third President ever elected without the popular vote following the 2000 Presidential Election.  Following the 9/11 attacks, the Bush Administration declared a long “War on Terror/Islam”. Based on sketchy information that Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction, Bush also declared war on Iraq. The wars abroad and the housing market collapse in the U.S. left his Presidency and America a wreck. And with the public’s anger came the conspiracy theories. The “Truthers” claim 9/11 was not the work of Muslim jihadists, but of the Bush Administration to gain respectability and blame Muslims for the attacks. But Bush’s Presidential successor got it even worse.

After an incredible keynote speech at the 2004 Democratic National Convention, Illinois Senator Barack Hussein Obama all but vanished. His 2007 announcement of Presidential candidacy went unnoticed until he upset former First Lady and New York Senator Hillary Rodham Clinton in the 2008 Iowa Caucus. “Birthers”, egged on by Hilary, claimed that Obama was born in Kenya, thus ineligible for Presidential candidacy. Obama actually presented a birth certificate that stated he was born in Hawaii to a Black Kenyan immigrant and a Kansas White woman several times, but that didn’t stop the Birthers (or the media using the slave owners’ “one-drop rule” to deem Obama the “first Black President”).  Despite, or maybe even because of, the controversy, Obama was elected President in 2008.

Conspiracy theories have now taken over politics, whether people admit it or not.  When an election doesn’t go as planned, the defeated voters claim there was voter fraud, which they never do when their people win. Or they’ll blame villainous billionaires like the Koch Brothers or George Soros for funding the winner’s campaign, which, again, they never do when their people win. Look at what happened when we wound up with a Democratic President and a Republican Congress, BOTH publicly elected. This had to be the work of the International Bankers. Never mind that almost ALL Presidents have had opposing Congresses.

But this is not exclusive to politics. I recall when iconic singer Whitney Houston died. Not even a week later, there were videos of Dave Chapelle and Brandy, in some sort of way, alluding to Whitney being an Illuminati sacrifice ordered by her longtime mentor, mega-producer Clive Davis. Whitney simply overdosing and dying after years of drug use would be too… rational. Let’s get closer to home. The conspiracy theories start out early. You know, “the teacher doesn’t like me.” That graduates to “I’m sorry you misunderstood me”, “I couldn’t help myself”, and “he can’t hold his liquor.”  Then you get “a legacy of slavery”, “the Prison Industrial Complex”, and “blaming the victim”.

So what’s the point of all this conspiracy business? Simply put, they shift blame anywhere but upon ourselves… where it most often truly belongs. It’s easier to blame the current political state in America on some “powers that be” than the self-absorbed voters that elected these people, or the lazy whiners that never voted at all. It’s easy to tell where unpopular politicians got their dubious manner. They got it from their voters. After all, America has a REPRESENTATIVE government.

It’s easier to cope with some secret society controlling people rather than accepting that other people don’t share your opinions. It’s nobler to be a sacrificial lamb than admit somebody selfishly did themselves in. And it’s always easier to act as if it’s society that made you like you are, when the overwhelming majority are nothing like you… even if they do make excuses for you.

When things don’t go as we like, or we just don’t like facing something we’ve done, conspiracies are often comforting, if not entertaining. The thing is, whatever we use them to avoid will inevitably be waiting on us, nonetheless. Contrary to conspirator doctrine, yes, most circumstances in life ARE controllable, and only losers would really say otherwise. For those situations that aren’t, well, there are ways of dealing with them that don’t require some mysterious underground explanation. Now, if you’ll excuse me, Tupac and I have a Bilderberg meeting to attend. (H/T Dave Higgins) Thank you for reading.

Volume Two Finale: Vince/Austin 2016

In this, the finale of Volume Two, I’d really just like to add more perspective to many of the things I’ve witnessed.

I never, ever feel bad for mocking Afrocentrism. First of all, not everybody Black engages in it. Secondly, seventy percent of its apologists live in middle-class and mostly White suburbs. And they support Afrocentrism to keep inner city Blacks “in their place”. If you really want to know what White liberals think of Afrocentric culture, look no further than who they elected as the so-called First President: a biracial man raised everywhere but the “hood”. Even worse, look at the virtually any statistic for Black people since 2009.

A lot of my LGBTetc. activist animus stems from my experiences with Afrocentrism. Credit should always be given where it’s due; their rise to prominence happened pretty fast. But they, like Afrocentric peddlers, tend to exalt the lowest common denominator in their community. That’s why there’s so much “gift-giving” and domestic violence in a very small community. And allowing it to go unchecked can undermine any progress made. And no, people do not have to others solely because of who they sleep with. Hell, you don’t, so why should anybody else?

Presidential Candidate and former Illinois Senator Barack Hussein “The Long-Legged Daddy” Obama is, in my view, one of the greatest campaigners of all time. But as the 44th President of the United States, he’s one of the worst Affirmative Action hires in history. You know how AA works: find the first non-White you can, promote him like hell, set him up as a figurehead… and let everybody else lead from behind. As author Shelby Steele points out, “President Obama is more of a cultural phenomenon than a political one”.

Even when the Republican Party did not have a sitting President, they were often the steady, trusted, fiscally responsible hand in Washington. The terms of both Presidents Bush killed that notion. The re-election of Obama has sent them absolutely into chaos. The days of riding the coattails of Ronald Reagan and the Christian Coalition are no more. The Tea Party, touted as a return to the old school GOP, have proven to be anything but. They’ve been relegated to mostly state and local  politics, with their most prominent national figures just kicking back. Why not? They’ll be re-elected out of brand loyalty, anyhow… with the Tea Party in tow.

The Religious Right called Mormonism a polygamist cult for years, then claimed that a Mormon elder, as President, could “bring America back to God”. The same fundamentalist who condemns homosexuality can be found all over GayPatriot comment sections, and letting their near-nude preteen daughters hustle grown men at a church car wash. With no sin left to rail against (the same-sex marriage issue is summarily decided), the religious right is rapidly evaporating as a key force in society. 

And since Gay Conservatives seem to be the only ones giving religionists any sympathy, one has to ask: with same-sex marriages federally recognized, is refusing to get one with your lover make you “living in sin” and “shacking up”?

A young guy from Canada recently pointed out something about most American “atheists”. They are actually not atheists, who do not acknowledge an absolute final sovereignty. Because their worship is ultimately either their culture or, more than likely, an all-powerful government that protects them from their ideological enemies and themselves, they are, by definition, Statists. All religions and the main two political parties have embraced it as of late. And much like those who worshiped the Austrian house painter or the Chinese rice farmer, they’ll bring a whole nation down in the abyss.

If you really want to see if things like MulticulturalismBalkanization, or any form of identity politics has ever worked here’s an idea. Ask your local gay, Black, fundamentalist, Muslim, “atheist” and moderate the best time they’ve lived through in their respective movement. NONE of their answers will match.

President Obama is the best thing to ever happen to talk radio. What else would Rush Limbaugh or Mark Levin do without him and the Democratic Party? The Advocate Magazine spends over sixty-five percent of its web space railing on Republicans or somebody else that hurts their feewings. But in the end their greatest and most prosperous weapon is… their biggest opponent.

The same people who swear by talk radio and MSNBC ridicule Vince McMahon and WWE. The funny part is, Vince is more honest than they are.When Vince McMahon and “Stone Cold” Steve Austin got done beating each other up, they both went out drinking, often to the same bar. But they both knew, and even now openly admit, they needed each other… to draw a happily paying audience. WWE fans know it’s scripted, too, but the whole point is to be entertained. Yeah, they get emotional at times, but eventually the match is over, and you’ve got to go home and get ready for the work week. (Shout out to Vince “Not McMahon” Smetana on that one) . And it’s fine to agree with people like Rush or Rachel Maddow, and buy their merchandise. But every so often, I think like other WWE fans. I can enjoy the spectacle, but recognize it as such… especially when it’s not on.

Volume Two, Chapter Nine: FINALLY Attaining the Holy Grail

You know, ever since the historic 2008 Presidential Election, the media has been absolutely obsessed with finding “The First”. It was during this election season that America was presented with the most diverse choices for the next Commander-in-Chief ever recorded. There was the first Mormon candidate (former Massachusetts Governor Willard “Mitt” Romney, Republican), the first major female candidate (former First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton, Democrat), and the first major “Black”, or actually Biracial, candidate (Illinois Senator Barack Hussein Obama, Democrat). The media’s ever-present identity fetish was in overdrive. After eight chaotic years of statist conservatism under Republican George W. Bush, the voting public wanted anything but another Republican, so Romney was out of the running early. The real battle was between Hillary and Obama. One of them would be “The First” of their kind. And when the inexperienced Obama had the White women voters in Iowa sighing at his every word, the “Long-Legged Mack Daddy” pushed Hillary out of the way. The media had their “First”. And the eventual GOP candidate, 72-year-old Arizona Senator John Sidney McCain, never stood a chance, even with Alaska Governor Sarah Palin as his Vice Presidential candidate, trying to woo female voters.

Well, we’ve seen several “Firsts” since then. Televangelist T.D. Jakes became “The First” Black Spiritual Counselor to a President. Eric Holder became “The First” Black U.S. Attorney General. And Sonya Sotomayor became “The First” Wise Latina Woman on the Supreme Court. But nothing, and I mean nothing, compares to the perhaps the most coveted “First” in modern “journalism”, which was handed to the media on April 30th, 2013. It was the announcement that Jason Collins, an obscure NBA basketball veteran, is gay. He is now “The First” openly gay male athlete in a mainstream team sport.

Don’t get me wrong here. I think it’s great that the NBA and America are welcome to an openly gay professional athlete. It’s very possible “The First” gay Michael Jordan could emerge from all this, with the focus he draws going to where it should, his talent, and not on his personal life. That’s assuming, of course, the media allows for it.

The Collins affair highlights the main problem with people steeped in identity politics, and people who center their entire life on one aspect of their life (or in the case of the media, everybody else’s). I’ve said this about online dating services for years, and it’s just as true in everything else: if all you want is somebody Black, pretty much anybody Black will do. It’s the same way with gay, White, blonde, on and on. It doesn’t matter that Jason Collins doesn’t average 4 points a game, went to three different teams this past season, and is not even currently signed to a team. It doesn’t matter that he was on the down-low for eight years with his blonde girlfriend (an everyday sight in Atlanta, and we know what’s happened to the Black community because of that). It doesn’t matter that something outside the game of basketball is pretty much the only reason to even sign the 34-year-old to a team, even if a more deserving athlete is cast aside. Jason Collins is “The First” openly gay pro athlete. The sacrifice required for a potential pro athlete’s love of the game is trumped by the love of the d*ck and a headline.

This is contrary to the legacies of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and the guy Collins is constantly being compared to, Baseball Hall of Famer Jackie Robinson. These two men broke barriers and SET EXAMPLES for others of all races to follow. As is the case with any major social movement, the few people who benefit from it will have to assimilate and validate themselves through the content of their character. Those willing to follow those examples were better off; those who didn’t were cut off. In a way, it’s wise for the media to pump up Jason Collins. Promoting a down-low marginal pro athlete presents a reachable standard. The LGBTetc. activist crowd is constantly looking to the media and celebrities to present for them the “role models” they’ve never been. By pushing Collins, there’s finally somebody to take the critical eyes of the general public off them, and somebody’s coattails they can ride. However, this will make the emergence of an outstanding gay athlete cumbersome. When this guy arrives, others will have somebody to compare them to on and off the field or court. People will now see there’s more than one kind of gay person, and will welcome the ones they like, and jettison those they don’t. It happened with Dr. King and Mr.Robinson, and will inevitably happen again. That’s part of the problem with pro sports, anyhow: we know more about their exploits outside the game (sex life, arrest record, financial dealings) than is really necessary.

I guess, as a gay person, I should be happy that President Obama took time out of his… busy schedule to personally call Jason Collins regarding his announcement. Never mind that the families of those in the Texas explosion or the Boston Marathon attack weren’t. And don’t get me started on his hometown of Chicago, the American murder capital. It’s all about being gay. Nothing else matters.